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Citing Sources

APA (American Psychological Assn.)

Read carefully as to whether the intended link in the citation takes one directly to the text of the book, or not. If DOIs are available provide them at the end of the reference and make them hypertext links. Read more from OWL Purdue about online-only e-books, Kindle editions, use of a URL, "retrieved" versus "available."  Read more in the Publication Manual of the APA on pp. 187-91 (at the Library Services Desk under REF DESK BF 76.7 .P83 2010).

PsycBOOKS examples:

Chun, K., Organista, P.B., & Marín, G. (Eds.). (2003). Acculturation: advances in theory, measurement, and applied research.  Retrieved from PsycBooks database. doi: 10.1037/10472-000

 

Chapter of a book written by a different author than the editor (note that the publisher information is not used when link takes you directly to the item):

Symonds, P.M. (1958). Human drives. In C. L. Stacey & M. DeMartino (Eds.), Understanding human motivation (pp. 11-22). Retrieved from PsycBooks database. doi:10.1037/11305-002

 

ConnectNY e-book example:  (The librarians recommend using the permalink from library catalog for the URL when citing a ConnectNY EBL e-book to avoid having your barcode display within the URL that displays when book is open. Since this link does not take you directly to item, use publisher information in the citation. Exclude the ~SO at the end; not necessary.)

West, M.A. (2016). The Psychology of Meditation. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://library.lemoyne.edu/record=b1765942

 

ACS (American Chemical Society)

Author, A. Book Title [Online]; Ed.; Publisher, Date, pagination. URL (Accessed date).

Example: (from ebrary)

Bachrach, SM. Computational Organic Chemistry [Online]; 2nd ed.; Wiley, 2014. http://library.lemoyne.edu/record=b1712626 (Accessed July 27, 2016).

 

AIP (American Institute of Physics

A.A. Surname and B.B. Surname, edition, Title of Book, Edition (Publisher, Place of Publication, Year of Publication), Retrieved from URL or ebook reader ed.

Example: (from JSTOR ebook)

R. Shankar. Fundamentals of Physics: Mechanics, Relativity, and Thermodynamics, (Yale University Press, New Haven, 2014), Retrieved from http://0-www.jstor.org.library.lemoyne.edu/stable/j.ctt5vm4b6.1

 

ASA (American Sociological Assn.)

E-book of a print edition accessed through one of the library's online book providers such as EBL or the History E-Book Project of ACLS: 

Use the permalink from library catalog when citing ConnectNY EBL e-books to avoid having your barcode number display in URL when book is open. Or, use the url given by the e-book product/database itself.

The first example below is a ConnectNY ebook. The second example (Turk) is an ACLS Humanities E-Book.

Duffy, Mignon, Amy Armenia, and Clare Stacey. 2015. Caring on the Clock: the Complexities and Contradictions of Paid Work CareRetrieved July 5, 2017 (http://library.lemoyne.edu/record=b1752994‚Äč).

Turk, Herman. 1973. Interorganizational Activation in Urban Communities. Washington, D.C.: American Sociological Association. Retrieved July 5, 2017 (http://0-hdl.handle.net.library.lemoyne.edu/2027/heb.06861.0001.001).

 

Books obtained from the open Internet follow the same pattern as print books with the URL and date of access included. Here are examples from Google Books (use URL for "read book") and the Critical Criminology website. Use the url that displays when the book is open to its cover or main page.

 

Cooley, Charles Horton. 1918. Social Process. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Retrieved February 2, 2015 (https://books.google.com/books/reader? id=4fQtAAAAIAAJ&output=reader&printsec=frontcover&pg=GBS.PP1).

 

Pepinsky, Harold E. and Paul Jesilow 1992. Myths that Cause Crime. Washington, D.C.: Seven Locks Press. Retrieved July 10, 2014 (http://critcrim.org/files/MythsThatCauseCrime.pdf).

 

 

 

Chicago Manual of Style

Electronic books are cited exactly as their print counterparts with the addition of a media marker at the end of the citation: Kindle edition, PDF e-book, Microsoft Reader e-book, Palm e-book, etc.  Read more from OWL@Purdue

Lemon, Rebecca, Emma Mason, Johnathan Roberts, and Christopher Rowland, ed. The Blackwell Companion to the Bible in English Literature. West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. PDF e-book.

CSE (Council of Science Editors)

C-S and C-N Format:

Author AA, Author BB, Author CC. Book title [Internet]. Ed. Publisher; cDate [accessed date]. Available from: URL.

Example: 

Heimann K, Katsaros C. Marine and freshwater botany: Advances in algal cell biology [Internet]. De Gruyter; c2013 [accessed 2016 July 27]. Available from: http://library.lemoyne.edu/record=b1696502~S0.

N-Y Format:

Author AA, Author BB, Author CC. cDate. Book Title [Internet]. Ed. Publisher; [accessed date]. Available from: URL.

Example:

Heimann K, Katsaros C. c2013. Marine and freshwater botany: Advances in algal cell biology [Internet]. De Gruyter; [accessed 2016 July 27]. Available from: http://library.lemoyne.edu/record=b1696502~S0.

MLA

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication. MLA lists electronic sources as Web Publications. Thus, when including electronic books, list the medium as Web.

E.g.,

Harvey, Frank P.  Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic and Evidence. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Web.

Legal Citation Styles (ALWD vs. Bluebook)

ALWD style: Cite as though it is a print book. Author's name as it appears on front cover. Note capitalization rule for prepositions.

Garrett Epps, American Justice 2014: Nine Clashing Visions before the Supreme Court (University of Pennsylvania Press 2014)

The Bluebook: Cite as though it is a print book. Author's name as it appears on front cover. Use "et al.," after first author if more than two authors. Capitalize prepositions longer than 4 letters.

Robert M. LoPucki, Jr. &  John Smith, Commercial Transactions Before the Courts. (2d ed. 2003).